The Denim Rag Pattern marches on!

The continuing saga of the Recycled Jeans/Denim Rag Quilt Pattern!

My pattern continues to develop. I’m almost done with the rough draft. I’ve been making corrections as I go so I think it’s a bit better than a true rough draft.

As I think I’ve mentioned before, it’s definitely a challenge to put actions into words. I know what I mean but am I getting that across?

Here’s a sample of something I’ve written. What do you think? Is it clear? Too wordy?

“Place the first denim circle WRONG side up on your work surface. Using a ruler, measure 1 ¼” from the outer most edge of the circle and mark this line along the edge of the ruler. Any pen will work; you will never see the line.

Place the marked circle and a second, unmarked circle from your row, RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER. Pin and sew along this line.”



Here’s where we left off last time. The table runner was completely assembled but not yet “raggy”. At this point, I got out the spring loaded scissors.
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Okay, there’s a separate blog post coming about spring loaded scissors.
I’ve learned a lot about them and which ones are more reliable.

Here’s what the runner looked like after clipping the edges with the rag scissors.

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I trimmed every edge except the outer edges. There’s no point in trimming them because they will be cut away prior to binding.

After trimming, I went to work on the clipped edges with a stiff brush. Similar in feel to a toilet brush, I always go over my trimmed edges with this brush. I find that it really speeds up the fraying process.
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As you know, a rag quilt gains it’s frayed, ragged edges after multiple washings and dryings. This is, of course, an important part of the process.
However, I give my quilts a good “once-over” with the brush before the first washing to speed the process of fraying.

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It can make a bit of a mess on your work surface but think about what you’re getting out ahead of time that won’t get stuck in your dryer’s lint trap!


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You can see how the brush lifts up the edges and begins to create that frayed look we are going for.
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And, here’s what it looks like after washing and drying.

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All that’s left is to cut away the edges and add the binding.

Heather

7 comments:

  1. Heather -

    Loving your denim rag quilt!! And just so you know - whatever the problem was with your page flashing on and off has apparently been fixed - I had no trouble getting to your blog today. YAY!! Keep quilting - and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

    Kitty

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  2. Hi Kitty,

    Thanks so much for the comment! And, yes, it was finally brought to my attention that something was wrong with my blog when it connected via Firefox. I contacted the person who designed the blog and she was able to fix the code. Yeah!!!! I'm so glad you came back! And Happy New Year to you too!

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  3. Could you give the dimensions of your circles and squares? I'd love to make one of these! Your's is beatiful!

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  4. Hi KD Candy,

    The squares are 5" charm squares and the circles are 6 1/2" in diameter! :)

    Heather

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  5. Replies
    1. I bound the edges like a traditional quilt.

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